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keep in touch with bipolarlab's latest and greatest news and learn from our experts!

1. What is the personal psychological support and befriending service?


The personal support and befriending service is a supportive intervention for people experiencing difficulties with their emotional health. The purpose of the service is to create a long-lasting and emotionally focused relationship between a patient and a BipolarLab mental health professional. This relationship meets important communicational needs and cultivates a sense of security and self-esteem for the patient.


2. What does it offer?


• Emotional support
• A mutual non-judgmental relationship of trust
• It helps to increase self-esteem and reduce social isolation
• A safe place for communication
• A basis for fresh start experiences
• Befriending with the ups and downs of a recurrent mood disorder
• Help and support in managing symptoms and preventing manic and depressive episodes

The personal support and befriending service enables people with bipolar disorder and depression to have a professional “confidant” and feel secure that there is someone there with them.


3. What it cannot do?


The personal support and befriending service cannot solve practical problems and cannot replace the psychopharmacological therapeutic services of a psychiatrist.


4. How it works?


You first need to book an initial consultation with a BipolarLab mental health professional. In the meeting you will be given information about the programme, its objectives and rules of operation. Then we will discuss your current problems and circumstances and review your mental health history. You will be asked to complete one brief questionnaire that will have questions about your mood and personality. In order to start it is important that you are not in a current crisis (e.g. manic or severe depressive episode) but of course you may have some symptoms. The meetings take place over the internet or on the phone once a week at a fixed pre-scheduled time and last for one hour (60 minutes).

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BipolarLab's initial consultation is the first point of contact with a Bipolarlab mental health specialist. At present, Dr Yanni Malliaris conducts all initial consultations.

The aim is to conduct an initial assessment of your needs and your current mental state in order to screen for the suitability of our services and guide you accordingly. The same initial assessment applies to relatives.

Before the consultation, you will be asked to complete two forms. The first form has a few questions about your current circumstances and history and the second form contains two questionnaires about your current mood.

During the consultation, we will discuss your current mood state and circumstances, your most recent mental health history, your physical health and other medical needs, your current circumstances and social needs, and your overall treatment goals.

At the end of the consultation, you will be given an oral report about your current state, and needs we have identified and we will make recommendations about BipolarLab's services or, if more appropriate, other suitable services or professionals. A brief written report can be provided at an additional cost.

If you combine it with my Mood Pulse you can have the best possible initial assessment of your current state and needs.

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It is of paramount importance to us to deliver the best possible services to the most suitable patients and relatives in order to yield the best outcomes and maintain a high quality of service. Hence we employ strict clinical and research criteria for selecting the most suitable participants for our private services. It is therefore possible that you will not be able to participate in some of our programmes even though you may be able to pay for them. If so, we will explain the reasons why and we will try to find together something that will be more suitable to your clinical needs.
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Dr Eirini ManthouEirini was born in Athens. Her studies are related to physical education, sports science and human nutrition. In 2003 she graduated from the Department of Physical Education and Sports Science in Trikala. Then she did her MSc in Human Nutrition in the University of Glasgow. At the same institution she completed her doctoral thesis, which is related to the impact of exercise on energy balance, on appetite and satiety regulation as well as the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolic parameters associated with chronic disease. In particular she is interested in the effects of exercise and nutritional management in Bipolar disorder and recurrent depression. She has been working as a professional personal trainer and nutritional counselor with individuals, schools and other professional organisations.

Eirini is BipolarLab's Director of Exercise and Nutrition eSupport programme. Her programmes promote physical activity, good dietary habits and healthy lifestyles for people with Bipolar disorder and recurrent depression.

 

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Dr Eirini Manthou

Tatiana Gorney began her career as a journalist at 17. After finishing journalism school, she wrote for Eleftherotypia Kyriakatiki, Greece's leading Sunday Newspaper. After 7 years there she felt something was missing. She wanted to do more for others so she decided to seek further education.

She studied psychology at Lancaster University in the U.K. and received a B.Sc in Psychology (2006).

When she returned to Greece, she continued her quest for further knowledge in the field of psychology via seminars and classes on Gestalt therapy, Cognitive therapy, Behavioral and Systemic therapy. However, it was Carl Rogers' book on the ”person – centered” approach that really inspired her and guided her decision to enroll in the Institute of Counseling and Psychological Studies and become a “person-centered counselor”. In addition to her private practice, she contributes her time and knowledge to many non-governmental organizations, including EDO The Hellenic Bipolar Organisation and the Roots Research Centre.

Tatiana co-ordinates BipolarLab's personal support and befriending services programme and also works as a Mood Monitoring Facilitator (MMF).

 

 

 

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Anastasia Sapouna

Anastasia graduated from the University of Essex with an honors BA degree in Psychology (first class). She then worked as an apprentice therapist with children and teenagers with autism and developmental deficits and with severe mental health patients in a community health centre in London. She continued her studies in Brunel University where she did an MSc in Counseling and Guidance in Education, with particular focus on counseling adolescents.

Upon returning to Greece, she collaborated with psychotherapeutic centers to gain further experience as a counselor and worked for the National department of Secondary Education, where she conducted numerous educational seminars on adolescence for public and private secondary school teachers. Following her passion on counseling and empowering adolescents, she undertook a diploma on becoming a vocational guidance counselor and since then she has been working with teenagers on a freelance basis and as an associate to Platon private school and IEPAS (Institute of Career and Professional Development). Through out her work with adolescents she appreciated the underlying emotional difficulties that hindered their schoolwork and family life and guided her therapeutic work towards enhancing emotional health and stability.

In 2010, she joined the professional network of EDO the Hellenic Bipolar Organisation and BipolarLab.com and she has focused all her clinical work on adolescent emotional health. Anastasia in collaboration with Dr. Malliaris have developed diagnostic and therapeutic (individual and group) programmes for teenagers (14-18) with emotional difficulties who may also have a parent or relative with bipolar or depressive disorder. These teenagers represent an important high-risk population for developing a mood disorder. As the latest evidence indicate early psychotherapeutic input is vital for preventing the development of a future bipolar or depressive disorder.

Anastasia provides her services as a Mood Monitoring Facilitator and also psychological support counselor in English and Greek.

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Dr Ruth OhlsenRuth trained as a general and psychiatric nurse in Australia and has had extensive experience in general adult psychiatry, including as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in mood disorders. She has extensive experience in the management and diagnosis of severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. She has worked to optimise strategies for relapse prevention in bipolar disorder. She managed the Maudsley Hospital clozapine clinic for over five years, and the Southwark First Episode Psychosis team for 2 years. She has published widely, including the Maudsley Antipsychotic Medication Review Guidelines, and has completed a PhD in antipsychotic induced weight gain. She is now working at the Institute of Psychiatry, London with the DoH funded IMPACT study and is involved in IOP and international collaborations on the genetics of antipsychotic induced metabolic dysregulation.

Ruth is the co-ordinator of BipolarLab's Diagnostic and Symptom Monitoring Services and along with Yanni conducts many of the assessments required for the delivery of BipolarLab's services and also supervises and trains other junior lab members.

 

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Dr Yanni Malliaris (aka Dr Yanni) graduated from Stirling University and UCLA with a first class honours degree in Psychology in 1999. During his undergraduate years he developed an interest in the psychosocial factors of affective disorders by studying with Professor Constance Hammen, and trained in behaviour modification with Professor Ivar Lovaas. He then went on to complete his military service in the Hellenic Airforce (2000-2002) and then worked as a research psychologist at the Institute of psychiatry, King’s College London (2002-2010), where he also completed his Doctoral PhD thesis under the supervision of Professor Dinesh Bhugra and Professor Tom Craig. At the Institute, he began his work with Professor Dominic Lam in the Psychology department and the Affective Disorders Unit. Following funding from the Medical Research Council he commenced his PhD thesis (2005-2010) where he explored the impact of sub-syndromal symptoms in the course of Bipolar disorder, and particularly the role of symptom variability in predicting relapse. His doctoral thesis became the basis of the novel diagnostic and symptom monitoring services now offered through BipolarLab.com. It was Dr Yanni's participants who appreciated the utility of having such services and making them available to all patients.

Upon successful completion of his work at the Institute, Dr Yanni decided to continue with his research and clinical work on a private basis through BipolarLab.com, a pioneer private clinical practice delivering specialist diagnostic, treatment and research services for Bipolar disorder and recurrent depression over the internet or locally in Athens, Greece or London, UK. In addition, in 2008, Yanni founded in his father's memory (George Malliaris) EDO the Hellenic Bipolar Organisation, Greece's first and now premier NGO organisation for people with bipolar disorder and depression.

Dr Yanni's broad research interests are in the phenomenology and integrative treatment of Bipolar disorder, and particularly the factors that predict the course of the disorder. He is also interested in mental health informatics and conducts research on the role of new technologies for tracking the variable course of Bipolar disorder. Along with a group of friends and colleagues, Yanni has developed iMonitor, a novel electronic mobile diary for assisting patients and researchers/clinicians to track the daily course of Bipolar Disorder. Finally, he practices Behavior therapy (and when needed cognitive therapy) for mood disorders and remains thankful to his late Professor (Dr Ivar Lovaas) for the training his received by one of the world's greatest and last radical behaviorists. He is proud for helping his patients to break their depressions as quickly as possible and helping them to maintain their stability for as long as possible.

As the Founder and CEO of BipolarLab, Dr Yanni is responsible for all the services offered through the clinical practice. He continues to conduct many of the assessments and therapy required for the delivery of BipolarLab's services but he is also lucky to have the help of many talented colleagues who share the work. He loves supervising and training new bipolarlab members, and also developing new clinical services in order to meet the never-ending clinical needs of his bipolar patients.

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Symptom Monitoring, Psycho-education and Relapse Prevention for People with Bipolar disorder and Recurrent depression


1. What is the clinical monitoring service?

The clinical monitoring service is an informational intervention for people with bipolar disorder and/or recurrent depression. The purpose of this service is to provide the best possible symptom monitoring before, during and after therapy, to educate about symptom monitoring methods and the patient's disorder, and finally to provide information that may help to prevent future relapses or to track progress during treatment. The programme was developed at the University of London, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London by Dr. Yanni Malliaris and his colleagues.

 

2. What does it offer?

  • Continuous monitoring of the symptoms of a bipolar or recurrent depressive disorder by expert mood monitoring facilitators using gold-standard assessments.

  • Training in symptom monitoring methods and self-assessment techniques.

  • Psychoeducation about manic and depressive symptoms and the course of these disorders.

  • User-friendly systematic feedback about the symptomatic status and response to treatments that may help to identify triggers and prevent future relapses.

  • Confirmation of a Bipolar or depressive disorder and clarification of the type of the mood disorder through the systematic and continuous monitoring.

  • Assessment of early signs of relapse and continuous monitoring of these signs using new technologies (iMonitor).

  • Use of advanced technologies for monitoring activity and sleep in a continuous and objective manner without burdening the patient.

  • The results of the program can be also useful to other health professionals with whom the patients works with and of course, for patient’s relatives who many times wish for a more thorough and comprehensive update.  The use of the results, as well as their dissimination to third parties (relatives, professionals) is always a private matter and choice of the patient.

 

3. What it cannot do?

The clinical monitoring service cannot replace drug treatments. Also, it works better when the patient is not in a crisis/episode but can continue during times that the patient is unwell. It cannot work without the explicit consent and collaboration of the patient.

 

4. Rationale and history of the clinical monitoring service

If you have a bipolar disorder or a recurrent depressive disorder you realise how important it is to keep constant track of your mood in order to identify your triggers and prevent future episodes. You also realise how important it is to keep track of your symptoms every time you change treatments. You may have been advised to keep a mood diary by your doctor or even better you may be trying to keep one already. You may have even been told that mood monitoring is even good therapy for you.

We realise that mood monitoring is vital for the majority of patients and their relatives but it is not always easy to do on your own. You may have mood assessments by your treatment providers but again their job is to treat you rather than keep a constant track of your mood. Nevertheless, in order to provide the best possible care they really need to know how you have been between appointments and during periods you have been away from treatment.

Over the last 5 years, and through Dr Malliaris thesis, we have turned mood monitoring into the science and service it deserves to be. The project started with important scientific aims namely identifying clinical and psychological factors that can predict who will become unwell and for how long in the future. Nevertheless, through the efforts of 43 Bipolar patients it soon became obvious that an important service had been developed. The majority of our participants really valued having an independent symptom monitoring service in their lives. We soon had realised that what we had developed was the best available "thermometer" for Bipolar disorder. This service goes far and beyond DIY mood diaries as it relies on expert human assessments (once upon a time Yanni and now BipolarLab's expert Mood Monitoring Facilitators).

The service involves a significant psycho-education component, as you will learn in the best possible manner how to monitor your moods and other symptoms. Ideally, before you start you should have completed the first diagnostic service that will give us important background information about your clinical history, diagnosis and symptom presentation.

Some times people with bipolar disorder become overly occupied with monitoring their moods and every single fluctuation is feared to be a sign of an impending episode. With the correct training in symptom monitoring and always with a human mood monitoring expert by your side such fears will quickly go away. Your own mood monitoring efforts will be greatly supported and enhanced, and most importantly you will realise that good monitoring only takes a little time from your life. Once mood monitoring becomes a habit, it will be like having learned to brush your teeth and cycle a bicycle when and as needed.

These 3 analogues really summarise the jist of our symptom monitoring service:

1. A thermometer for your moods.

2. A touth brush  for your day.

3. A bicycle for your life.

 

5. How it works?

There are 3 phases to this service. The baseline phase, where we check your diagnosis and current symptom levels. Then, the symptom-monitoring phase, where you learn how to keep track of your mood and other symptoms in a systematic and structured manner. And finally, the follow-up phase, where we have regular monthly or quarterly or annual checks of your symptoms and episodes.

1. Baseline Phase: 1 session (Spartan plan) to 10 sessions (Persian plan)

2. Symptom Monitoring Phase: 12 weeks (minimum) to life

3. Follow-up phase: monthly, quarterly, annually for life

We have 3 symptom monitoring packages that differ on the amount of human contact you get and subsequently their cost.

The Spartan plan is our most basic symptom monitoring package. It involves a brief assessment of your history and current state, and then symptom monitoring  takes places using self-report questionnaires and basic human contact. Spartans were very self-sufficient and were famous for their laconic (little talk) interactions and lack of money.

The Athenian plan is our regular symptom monitoring package. It involves an assessment of your history and current state using both questionnaires and a human expert. The symptom monitoring phase also involves expert human based assessments. Athenians liked to philosophise a bit more and thrived on intelligent human contact. They were a bit more well off than Spartans, and appreciated good human services in their life.

The Persian plan is our premium symptom monitoring package. It involves the most thorough baseline assessments and the most thorough possible symptom monitoring and follow-up assessements. Persians used to live in luxury and to have everything they wanted in their lives. They had lots of slaves who also lived in luxury but served all their needs. There are no limits to what we can do with this plan. You may even live in Los Angeles and have one of our mood monitoring facilitators come to your house or spent the entire baseline and symptom monitoring phase in an exotic villa on a beautiful greek island (we will even help you to pick your island and villa house).

The use of Technology in assisting your symptom monitoring

In order to use the service you will only need to have access to a telephone line and to a computer connected to the internet.

Additionally, we use a number of important technologies that greatly enhance your mood monitoring efforts and also the quality of the data we collect from you.

 

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Clinical Assessment, Diagnosis, and Guidance for people with mental health difficulties

 

1. What is the clinical assessment and diagnostic service?

The clinical assessment and diagnostic service is an informational intervention for people with mental health difficulties. The purpose of this service is to provide the best possible clinical assessment, to identify the individual needs of each patient and to provide an initial and also a very thorough diagnostic examination. It also aims to educate the patient about the diagnostic process and its findings. Its ultimate purpose is to operate as a precursor of the patient’s therapy. The program was developed at the University of London, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London by Dr. Yanni Malliaris and his colleagues.


2. What does it offer?

Clinical assessment of the person’s present mental health condition.
Clinical assessment of the person’s mental health needs.
Systematic recording (documentation) of the person’s mental health history.
Psychometric assessment of the person’s present condition and mental health history.
Diagnosis with the use of validated psychometric tools and structured interviews.
Education and guidance about the person’s diagnosis and their clinical needs.
Referral to the most appropriate specialist therapeutic program offered by BipolarLab or by an external professional/mental health center that specialises in whatever therapy will be most suited to the clinical needs of the patient.
Continuous monitoring of the clinical condition (status) and the course of the patient’s therapy (see Prodromos-Monitoring).

The clinical assessment and diagnosis service enables people with mental health difficulties to make a systematic assessment of their mental status and to become educated about their diagnosis (if any) and their therapeutic choices. The results of the program can be also useful to other health professionals with whom the patient works and of course, for the patient’s relatives who often wish for a more thorough and comprehensive update.  The use of the results, as well as their dissemination to third parties (relatives, professionals) is always a private matter and is entirely the patient's choice. BipolarLab will never divulge any information to third parties without the patient's consent.


3. What it cannot do?

The clinical assessment and diagnostic service cannot resolve immediate practical problems, or can it provide therapy. It is the first and most important step for subsequent effective therapeutic interventions. Also, it works better when the patient is not in a crisis/episode.


4. How it works?

The clinical assessment and diagnostic service is completed in three stages lasting 10-15 hours. It make take place over the internet or locally in our day care centre Dimiourgia in Rafina, Greece. In special circumstances we may make arrangements to conduct our assessment programme in the patient's home anywhere in the world.


Clinical assessment and diagnosis programme summary


1st Stage: Introduction (acquaintance) and Clinical Assessment (2 hours)

1st assessment: Introduction and First Clinical Assessment with the patient (1 hour)
2nd assessment: Introduction and Second Clinical Assessment with a family member or a close friend of the patient (1 hour)* (optional upon consent of the patient)


2nd Stage: Psychometric Assessment and Diagnosis (9 hours)

3rd assessment: Assessment of the present mental state with validated psychometric tools (1.5 hours)
4th assessment: Assessment of the clinical history and the personality with validated psychometric tools (1.5 hours)
5th assessment: Assessment of the present mental state and history with validated structured clinical interviews (2 hours)
6th assessment: Assessment of the clinical history and personality with validated structured clinical interviews
7th assessment:  Assessment of childhood and developmental history with validated structured interview and psychometric tools (2 hours)
8th assessment:  Assessment of life events and psychosocial context with validated structured interview and psychometric tools (2 hours)


3rd Stage: Psycheducation, Guidance & Therapy formulation (2 hours)

9th assessment: Education about the results of the assessments and the patient’s clinical needs (1 hour)
10th assessment: Guidance about the best possible therapeutic solutions and therapy formulation (1 hour)

 

Get started here!

 

 

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Yes Bipolar!

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Yes, Bipolar was the first open art exhibition on Bipolar disorder in Greece. It took place in April 2010 and was hosted by the Hellenic Bipolar Organisation (EDO) in Athens, Greece.

The art exhibition sparkled great interest in the public. The majority of the participants were artists (some famous, others not but all great) who had an interest or even personal experiences with Bipolar disorder. The proceeds from this unique artwork are shared between the artists and the Hellenic Bipolar Organisation. BipolarLab is supporting both the artists and the non-profit organisation by simply promoting the work to an international audience.

Here we exhibit some of the best work that is available to purchase. We welcome you to support this novel exhibition. You may view the artwork that is available to purchase in the gallery below. All the gallery items (albeit with greek descriptions can be found here: http://yes.bipolar.gr). For any questions please contact us directly.

 


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iMonitor

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iMonitor is our flagship product. It is a user-friendly electronic mood diary running on mobile devices (PDAs, Palm, Android, iPhone) and desktop computers (PC/Mac). It is suitable for brief clinical monitoring of bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness) and other related conditions (recurrent affective disorders, major depression, brief depression, ADHD, Borderline PD).

iMonitor has been used and validated in the Maudsley Bipolar eMonitoring Project and also in the MIRIAD Project (Mood Instability Research In ADHD) at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London.

It can monitor the following variables primarily using Visual Analog Scales (VAS 0-100), either on a daily or momentary basis:

1. High/Low Mood
2. Function
3. Sleep (onset, offset, quality)
4. Activation
5. Self-esteem (positive/negative)
6. Switches
7. Medication adherence
8. Life event impact (positive/negative)
9. Journal (open ended)
10. and up to 10 individual early signs of relapse / symptoms / behaviours.

It is very simple and easy to use and it only takes roughly 2 minutes to complete.

You may register your interest to receive an introductory offer for purchasing iMonitor.

 

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Getting started with us is easy.

You can get started in 3 simple steps:

1. Have a good read through the programmes and services we have and see whether we have something that may be suitable to your needs. Keep detailed notes for any questions you may have for later.

2. Book an initial consultation with one of our mental health specialists who will discuss your situation and needs in further detail and also give you an opinion about which programme or service would be more useful to you and how we can tailor our services to meet your individual needs.

3. Prior to your initial consultation it would help to fill out our screening form that will also help us to discuss your situation and problems in a more structured manner. Try to be as thorough and honest as you can on this form so we can best meet your needs later on.

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Welcome to the official website of the Hypomanic Check List Questionnaire! Here you will find all the required background information and ongoing work with this important measure. The website consists of the following sections:

Page 1: Introduction

Page 2: Research Goals & Development of HCL

Page 3: Selection of Patients for HCL Studies

Page 4: Epidemiological Studies & Comparison with Other Instruments

Page 5: Publications & References Page

6: Contact Information (webgroup/mailing list)

 

NEW - We Just Launched our Online Web-Survey with HCL-32, titled: "Investigating Energy, Activity, and Mood Across the World" ...Click Here to Participate!!!

*remember to mention that you found the survey through BipolarLab.com in order to assist with our data analysis. If you wish to have a report provide your contact details at the end of the survey. Unfortunately, we do NOT have yet the facility in place to provide individual reports, but we are working on it. Your data at this stage will help us to provide accurate individual responses in the future. Introduction

angst The HCL-32 is a checklist of 32 items for the self-assessment of hypomania. It is currently used in research projects as a screening instrument in order to identify potential cases of bipolarity and to help the clinician to diagnose major and minor bipolar disorder in patients with a current or a previous history of depression.

The HCL was developed by Professor Jules Angst who also leads the current work. Source article (includes scale in english, italian, and swedish)*: Angst, J., R. Adolfsson, et al. (2005). "The HCL-32: a self assessment tool for hypomanic symptoms." Journal of Affective Disorders 88: 217-233. click here to request a pdf copy of the article The development of the HCL is an international collaborative effort. Translations (forth and back) of the HCL-32 exist into the following languages: Norwegian, Swedish, Polish, Croatian, Russian, German, Greek, Dutch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese, Italian, Sardinian Italian, Hungarian, Taiwan Chinese and mainland Chinese. Currently the instrument is in translation into Arabic (Lebanon). (The remaining HCL-32 scales from different languages will be added shortly) switzerland UK sweden germany italy greece spain dutch norway poland portugal russia france croatia hungary china lebanon brazil

Page 1: Introduction Page 2: Research Goals & Development of HCL Page 3: Selection of Patients for HCL Studies Page 4: Epidemiological Studies & Comparison with Other Instruments Page 5: Publications & References Page 6: Contact Information (webgroup/mailing list) Goals 1) The first goal is to construct an instrument for self-assessment of hypomania, which can be used internationally in both primary care and psychiatry. It should help to reduce the world-wide problem of the under-diagnosis of major and minor bipolar disorders. 2) The second goal is to make the HCL scale trully international. The international applicability requires a transcultural development. In contrast to many other instruments that were developed in one language and later translated into others, the HCL-32 is not only translated but it is also developed and tested in as many languages and cultures as possible. 3) The third goal is to replicate the factor structure of the HCL-32 and its two sub-scales, and to define the optimal score which distinguishes best between diagnostic cases and non-cases. 4) The fourth goal is to compare the HCL-32 with the MDQ (mood disorder questionnaire) in terms of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of bipolar-II disorder. 5) The fifth goal is to shorten the current scale with 32 items on the basis of the available data without a significant loss of sensitivity and specificity. Development Currently, the instrument is in the third phase of its development. A shorter version with 20 items (HCL-20) was applied repeatedly from 1986 to 1999 during four interviews in a prospective cohort study of a community sample in Switzerland, and the first time for self-assessment in a nation-wide study in psychiatric practice in France (Allilaire et al. 2001). In a second phase, the checklist was extended to 32 items (HCL-32) in order to be tested and later reduced again in an international co-operation. The first studies with the HCL-32 were carried out in psychiatric out-patients from Italy and Sweden (Angst et al. 2005 in print JAD) and in community samples from Sweden and Germany. In the third phase, additional studies were carried out in patient samples from Cagliari (Hardoy et al. 2005 submitted) and Barcelona (Vieta et al. in preparation); further research is ongoing in several other countries. In a forth phase, the HCL-32 will be used in studies of advocacy groups (Gamian). Translations (forth and back) of the HCL-32 exist into the following languages: Norwegian, Swedish, Polish, Croatian, Russian, German, Greek, Dutch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese, Italian, Sardinian Italian, Hungarian, Taiwan Chinese and mainland Chinese. Currently the instrument is in translation into Arabic (Lebanon).

Selection of patients for studies in phases 1 to 3 and phase 4 Page 1: Introduction Page 2: Research Goals & Development of HCL Page 3: Selection of Patients for HCL Studies Page 4: Epidemiological Studies & Comparison with Other Instruments Page 5: Publications & References Page 6: Contact Information (webgroup/mailing list) The following are some general guidelines that we recommend to any researchers interested in using and validating the HCL: In clinical studies of mood disorders about 150 patients (preferably MDD, BP-II and fewer BP-I patients) should be given the HCL-32 and diagnosed by experienced clinicians. This number of cases allows factor analyses and computations of sensitivity and specificity of different cut-offs. Patient samples could be either hospitalised and/or outpatients or patients in general practice. In phase 4, any patients with and also without mood disorders (for instance GAD and Panic attacks), can be selected. The groups size can consist of about 50 or more patients per center. The clinical diagnosis of hypomania can based on DSM-IV criteria but one has to be aware that the diagnostic criteria for DSM-IV hypomania have not been validated. In addition softer criteria for bipolarity, for instance 1 (or 2) instead of 4 days minimum duration of hypomania can be applied but have to be specified. The Zurich study point of view, suggests a strict and a broad diagnostic specifier for bipolarity. Both definitions include overactivity as criterion A in addition to euphoria/irritability. The strict definition requires 3 of 7 DSM-IV symptoms of mania plus social or personal consequences attributable to the syndrome (distress, social problems, impairment). The broad definition requires only 2 of the 7 symptoms of mania (DSM-IV). It might also be of interest to identify suspected cases of bipolar depression by the HCL-32 in order to predict switches to hypomania under antidepressants. Such selected cases can be defined by the presence of major depression with a positive family history for bipolar/manic disorders. This study type requires a prospective design.

Epidemiological studies Page 1: Introduction Page 2: Research Goals & Development of HCL Page 3: Selection of Patients for HCL Studies Page 4: Epidemiological Studies & Comparison with Other Instruments Page 5: Publications & References Page 6: Contact Information (webgroup/mailing list) Studies on the factor structure of the HCL-32 in normal population samples were carried out in Germany and Sweden; a first paper is already in preparation (Meyer et al. 2006). There was good agreement with the two factors found in patient studies. Internet: A web-version of the HCL-32 has been developed help to collect data from the normal population. It will be of interest to see the presence of hypomanic symptomatology in non clinical cases from an international group with access to the internet. This work is conducted by Yanni Malliaris and his student George Salaminios at the Institute of Psychiatry in the UK. The survey is currently online. Follow the link to participate: NEW - We Just Lunched our Online Web-Survey with HCL-32, titled: "Investigating Energy, Activity, and Mood Across the World" ...Click Here to Participate!!! *remember to mention that you found the survey through BipolarLab.com in order to assist with our data analysis. If you wish to have a report provide your contact details at the end of the survey. Comparisons with other instruments Another screening instrument for bipolar spectrum disorders is the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) of Hirschfeld et al. 2000. This is compared to the HCL-32 but it is also more tailored to the diagnostic concept of DSM-IV hypomania. The MDQ has good sensitivity and specificity for BP-I disorder, specific data on BP-II disorders have not been published yet (Hirschfeld et al.). A German version of the MDQ is available (Kasper 2003). Up to now there is no study in which the MDQ was given together with the HCL-32. There is one analysis (Carta et al. submitted 2005), which compared two very similar patient samples, a first assessed with the MDQ and a second with the HCL-32. A direct correlation of MDQ with the HDL-32 was obtained from a study in Barcelona (Vieta et al. in preparation); it shows a correlation of over .80. Financial support There is no financial support available from Zurich. In a few centres research on the HCL-32 was supported by pharmaceutical companies.

Publications Page 1: Introduction Page 2: Research Goals & Development of HCL Page 3: Selection of Patients for HCL Studies Page 4: Epidemiological Studies & Comparison with Other Instruments Page 5: Publications & References Page 6: Contact Information (webgroup/mailing list) There are no copyright fees with the HCL. Researchers using the instrument are free to publish their results independently. In order to avoid copyright problems the authors should always cite the first paper on the HCL: Angst, J., R. Adolfsson, et al. (2005). "The HCL-32: a self assessment tool for hypomanic symptoms." Journal of Affective Disorders 88: 217-233. click here to download a pdf copy of the article Joint data analysis and publications In order to develop a shorter scale every centre is asked to send their data (after they have been analysed locally) to Zurich in order to allow later joint analyses and publications. If a centre needs support in data processing this might be given by the Zurich group. References: 1. Diagnosis of BP Angst, J., A. Gamma, et al. (2003). "Diagnostic issues in bipolar disorder." Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 13: S43-S50. Angst, J., A. Gamma, et al. (2003). "Toward a re-definition of subthreshold bipolarity: epidemiology and proposed criteria for bipolar-II, minor bipolar disorders and hypomania." J Affect Disord 73: 133-146. 2. HCL-20 Angst, J., 1992. L'hypomanie. A propos d'une cohorte de jeunes. Encephale, 18, 23-29. Allilaire, J. F., E. G. Hantouche, et al. (2001). "Fréquence et aspects cliniques du trouble bipolaire II dans une étude multicentrique française: EPIDEP." Encéphale XXVII: 149-158. Hantouche, E. G., J. Angst, et al. (2003). "Factor structure of hypomania: interrrelationships with cyclothymia and the soft bipolar spectrum." J Affect Disord 73: 39-47. 3. HCL-32 Angst, J., R. Adolfsson, et al. (2005). "The HCL-32: a self assessment tool for hypomanic symptoms." J Affect Disord 88: 217-233. Hardoy, M. C., M. G. Carta, et al. (2005). L'accuratezza dell' "Hypomania Check List-32" (HCL-32) in un campione di individui afferenti ad un servizio psichiatrico universitaro. La psichiatria che cambia in un mondo in trasformazione. X Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Psicopatologia, Rom, Pacini Editore. 4. MDQ Hirschfeld, R. M. A., J. B. W. Williams, et al. (2000). "Development and validation of a screening instrument for bipolar spectrum disorder: the mood disorder questionnaire." Am J Psychiatry 157: 1873-1875. Hirschfeld, R. M. A., C. Holzer, et al. (2003). "Validity of the mood disorder questionnaire: a general population study. (brief report)." Am J Psychiatry 160: 178-180. Kasper, S. (2003). Sicher therapieren bei bipolaren Störungen, PM Verlag. 5. HCL-32 and MDQ Hardoy, M. C., M. G. Carta, et al. (2005). L'accuratezza dell' "Hypomania Check List-32" (HCL-32) in un campione di individui afferenti ad un servizio psichiatrico universitaro. La psichiatria che cambia in un mondo in trasformazione. X Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Psicopatologia, Rom, Pacini Editore.

Contact Information Page 1: Introduction Page 2: Research Goals & Development of HCL Page 3: Selection of Patients for HCL Studies Page 4: Epidemiological Studies & Comparison with Other Instruments Page 5: Publications & References Page 6: Contact Information (webgroup/mailing list) We would encourage all inquiries to be addressed through our web-forum. By doing this we will avoid the inevitable but unnecessary repetition of questions, and slowly the forum will develop into an invaluable resource for matters relating to HCL. For more private communication you may still use the contact form: http://www.bipolarlab.com/contact/

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The members of BipolarLab's team consist of clinical researchers and practitioners, technical software and hardware IT experts, business consultants, and patient-experts. We have a truly multi-disciplinary team. The backgrounds and CVs of our members speak on their own for the quality of our team.

Our clinical team members have trained and worked in psychology or psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London and other esteemed clinical academic centers.

Our technical team is equally strong. They have developed amazing technical products on their own.

Our business consultants have experience in marketing, capital funding, and the high luxury industry and finally

Our patient-experts are true and amazing experts in their bipolar disorder currently doing great work in advocacy and education across the world.

Dr Yanni MalliarisDr Eirini ManthouDr Ruth OhlsenMiss Tatiana GorneyMiss Christina GerazounisMiss Natasa SapounaDr Mike HadjulisDr Tom WernerDr Richardo Sainz FuertesDr Daniel LiebermanDr Roderic Gorney

Mr Andy SoupianasMr Alexey GuesevDr Kristof Van LaerhovenMr Andrew HoppsMr Dimitris TzililisMr Chris Mistriotis

 

 

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Dr Yanni Malliaris, B.Sc. Hons (Psychology), Ph.D
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London
Founder and CEO of BipolarLab
Director of Diagnostic, Treatment and Research Services

BipolarLab Profile
:: Curriculum Vitae

 

Dr Ruth Olshen, RGN, RMN, Ph.D
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London
Co-ordinator of Diagnostic and Symptom Monitoring Services
Mood Monitoring Facilitator (MMF)

BipolarLab Profile :: Curriculum Vitae

 

Dr Eirini Manthou, B.Sc. Hons, MSc., Ph.D
Department of Nutrition and Medicine, Glasgow University
Director of Exercise and Nutrition eSupport programme
Co-ordinator of webinars (online seminars)

BipolarLab Profile :: Curriculum Vitae

 

Miss Tatiana Gorney, B.Sc. Hons (Psychology)
University of Lancaster, UK 
Co-ordinator of Psychological Support Services
Mood Monitoring Facilitator (MMF)


BipolarLab Profile :: Curriculum Vitae

 

Miss Christina Gerazounis, B.Sc. Hons (Psychology)
University of Michigan, USA 
Mood Monitoring Facilitator (MMF)
Psychological Support Counselor


BipolarLab Profile :: Curriculum Vitae


Miss Natasa Sapouna, B.Sc. Hons (Psychology)
University of Essex, UK 
Mood Monitoring Facilitator (MMF)
Psychological Support Counselor

BipolarLab Profile :: Curriculum Vitae

 

BipolarLab Associate Psychiatrists

Our associate psychiatrists specialize in different areas of bipolar disorder and are usually available for remote consultations and second opinion reviews. They assist with different aspects of the available programmes and services, especially our diagnostic programme. A referral to them may take place following completion of our diagnostic programme or our initial consultation if it is deemed more appropriate. They are also responsible for the medical treatment (pharmacotherapy) of local cases in London, UK and Athens, Greece.

Dr Mike Hadjulis, M.D., P.hD
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London
Lecturer, University of Athens
BipolarLab Associate Psychiatrist

 

Dr Tom Werner, M.D., M.Sc.
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London
BipolarLab Associate Psychiatrist

 

 

Dr Ricardo Sainz Fuertes, M.D., P.hD
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London
BipolarLab Associate Psychiatrist

 

 

Dr Daniel Lieberman, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
University of Washington
BipolarLab Associate Psychiatrist

 

Dr Roderic Gorney, M.D., P.hD
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry
University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)
BipolarLab Associate Psychiatrist

 

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Andy Soupianas, BSc. Hons (Robotics), MSc. (IT)
Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, UK
Programmer and developer of iMonitor Day open source version (Palm OS edition)

 

 

Alex Gusev, BSc. Hons (Applied Math & Physics)
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology
Programmer, Developer of iMonitor Moment open source version (Palm OS edition)

 

 

Dr Kristof Van Laerhoven, B.Sc., P.hD.
Lancaster University, UK
Software and Hardware expert, Developer of the Porcupine Actiwatch

 

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Andy Hopps, BA (Marketing), M.Sc, Founder and CEO MarinePM
University of Stirling
Marketing Consultant

 

 

Dimitris Tzililis, BSc., M.Sc.
Imperial College Business School
Venture Capital Consultant

 

 

Chris Mistriotis, B.Sc., M.Sc.
Imperial College Business School 
Treasurer and Financial Consultant

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We are keen to have on-board expert bipolar patients who will be able to contribute their experiences on our blog, evaluate and advise us on our existing and new clinical services. There may be possibilities to offer private user-led services with the guidance and supervision of our clinical team to our patients.

If you are interested in joining our expert-patient team send an email ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) with a brief biographical note, the reasons you wish to join us, and your CV.

 

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Products

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In this section you will find information about BipolarLab's products. We like to develop bipolar friendly products that have important applications in our clinical services and research.

For now you will find information about iMonitor, our electronic mood diary, and also Yes, Bipolar 2010! the first open art exhibition organised by the Hellenic Bipolar Organisation (EDO).

More products will be announced and listed here in the near future.

 

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Bipolarlab's members and associates are active in publishing their research in peer-reviewed journals. The process of publishing one's work may be time consuming and often painful but it is the best way to ensure a high quality standard of work.

Our services are based on their entirety on data-driven research. Our research has also been presented at many national (UK) and international conferences and has received funding from world famous, highly respected Research councils and other funding bodies.

Here you can also find out about existing research studies that continue through this lab and you can participate online.

 

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Join us

Contact us

support@bipolarlab.com
+302108816137
Skype: Bipolarlab